Doing legal aid work

Doing legal aid work

Legal aid services

Our partnership with private practitioners is essential for the provision of legal aid services. The significant involvement of private practitioners in the legal aid scheme enables us to help more people access legal services.

Legal aid work is undertaken by lawyers at:

  • Victoria Legal Aid (‘in-house practitioners’)
  • private practice law firms that are eligible to undertake legal aid work (‘private practitioners’)
  • community legal centres.

See our annual report for more about our work with private practitioners, including the firms receiving the highest aggregate payments for legal aid cases.

Private panel practitioners

Members of our section 29A panels provide legal representation to clients who are eligible for a grant of legal assistance. In 2014–15, 68 per cent of grants of legal assistance was for work assigned to private practitioners.

Private practitioner duty lawyers

Private practitioners play a critical role in our duty lawyer program, especially in extending our reach to rural and regional communities. Lawyers must be accredited to be part of the scheme.

In 2014–15, eight per cent of duty lawyer services were provided by private practitioners through the support of local law associations.

Briefing Victoria Legal Aid Chambers

Our Chambers advocates provide high quality representation for clients with a grant of legal assistance. They can be briefed to appear for clients by Victoria Legal Aid lawyers and private practitioners on our panels.

Seeking and recovering costs in legal aid matters

It is a condition of a grant of legal assistance that costs are recovered wherever possible. To help you recover costs, we have put together snapshots that cover how to seek and recover costs.

Trial Counsel Development Program

The Trial Counsel Development Program is designed to deliver unique training opportunities to selected Junior Counsel by partnering them with senior trial advocates.